The Effects of Youth Anxiety Treatment on School Impairment

Differential Outcomes Across CBT, Sertraline, and their Combination

Amanda L. Sanchez*, Jonathan S. Comer, Stefany Coxe, Anne Marie Albano, John Piacentini, Scott N. Compton, Golda S. Ginsburg, Moira A. Rynn, John Timothy Walkup, Dara J. Sakolsky, Boris Birmaher, Philip C. Kendall

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Youth anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and are associated with considerable school impairment. Despite the identification of well-supported strategies for treating youth anxiety, research has yet to evaluate the differential effects of these treatments on anxiety-related school impairment. The present study leveraged data from the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study to examine differential treatment effects of CBT, sertraline, and their combination (COMB), relative to placebo (PBO), on anxiety-related school impairment among youth (N = 488). Latent growth modeling revealed that all three active treatments demonstrated superiority over PBO in reducing anxiety-related school impairment over time, with COMB showing the most robust effects. According to parent report, medication strategies may have stronger effects on anxiety-related school impairment among males than among females. Results were discrepant across parents and youth. Findings are discussed in terms of clinical implications for anxious youth and the need for continued research to examine treatment effects on anxiety-related school impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChild psychiatry and human development
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sertraline
Anxiety
Therapeutics
Placebos
Anxiety Disorders
Research
Parents
Growth

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Anxiety
  • CAMS
  • CBT
  • Child
  • School impairment
  • Sertraline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Sanchez, Amanda L. ; Comer, Jonathan S. ; Coxe, Stefany ; Albano, Anne Marie ; Piacentini, John ; Compton, Scott N. ; Ginsburg, Golda S. ; Rynn, Moira A. ; Walkup, John Timothy ; Sakolsky, Dara J. ; Birmaher, Boris ; Kendall, Philip C. / The Effects of Youth Anxiety Treatment on School Impairment : Differential Outcomes Across CBT, Sertraline, and their Combination. In: Child psychiatry and human development. 2019.
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Sanchez, AL, Comer, JS, Coxe, S, Albano, AM, Piacentini, J, Compton, SN, Ginsburg, GS, Rynn, MA, Walkup, JT, Sakolsky, DJ, Birmaher, B & Kendall, PC 2019, 'The Effects of Youth Anxiety Treatment on School Impairment: Differential Outcomes Across CBT, Sertraline, and their Combination', Child psychiatry and human development. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10578-019-00896-3

The Effects of Youth Anxiety Treatment on School Impairment : Differential Outcomes Across CBT, Sertraline, and their Combination. / Sanchez, Amanda L.; Comer, Jonathan S.; Coxe, Stefany; Albano, Anne Marie; Piacentini, John; Compton, Scott N.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Rynn, Moira A.; Walkup, John Timothy; Sakolsky, Dara J.; Birmaher, Boris; Kendall, Philip C.

In: Child psychiatry and human development, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Piacentini, John

AU - Compton, Scott N.

AU - Ginsburg, Golda S.

AU - Rynn, Moira A.

AU - Walkup, John Timothy

AU - Sakolsky, Dara J.

AU - Birmaher, Boris

AU - Kendall, Philip C.

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