The efficacy of image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy in neurologically symptomatic acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients

Robert M. Levy*, Eric Russell, Margaret Yungbluth, Denise Frias Hidvegi, Betty Ann Brody, Mauro C.Dal Canto

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

A prospective series of 50 neurologically symptomatic human immunodeficiency infected patients with intracranial lesions who underwent image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy is presented. Patients were diagnosed with primary central nervous system lymphoma (14 patients), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (14 patients), toxoplasmosis (13 patients), human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (3 patients), infarction (2 patients), and 1 patient each with metastatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic melanoma, cryptococcoma, and atypical mycobacterial infection. Two of the patients with toxoplasmosis had a second intracranial abnormality. Two biopsies resulted in either descriptive diagnosis only or were nondiagnostic; the definitive diagnostic efficacy of image-guided stereotactic biopsy was thus 96%. No deaths were incurred as a result of biopsy. Four intraoperative or postoperative hemorrhages occurred; in only 1 patient was there a residual neurological deficit related to the surgery. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy may thus be considered both safe and effective in this patient population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)186-190
Number of pages5
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1992

Keywords

  • Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
  • Brain biopsy
  • Lymphoma
  • Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy
  • Stereotactic surgery
  • Toxoplasmosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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