The enhancing effect of incongruent verbal priming stimuli on the CIT effect with pictorial probes in the P300-based complex trial protocol

Tingting Sui, Evan Sitar, J. Peter Rosenfeld*, Elena Labkovsky, Anne Ward, Elena Davydova

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previous research (Herring et al., 2011) indicated that certain types of incongruent verbal priming enhance responding to the subsequent (primed) stimuli. By priming participants in a P300-based Concealed Information Test (CIT), we examined the possible enhancement effects of priming stimuli in the P300 based Complex Trial Protocol (CTP) for face recognition. Participants were divided into two groups: one group with priming and one control group without. The probe (Pr) and irrelevants (Iall) of the two groups were faces, namely, pictures of the actor Tom Cruise (Pr) and of other unknown faces (Iall). One group had priming before Pr/Iall and one control group had no priming. The priming group was called the non-identical priming (NIP) group in which the verbal priming item (the name, “Bill Smith”) is identical with neither Pr nor any of the Ialls. The group without priming is the control group which is called the non-priming group (NP) that simply experiences the basic Complex Trial Protocol. Results were that non-identical priming produced larger CIT effects than the control group, which is consistent with earlier findings. Also, the amplitude of the probe of the NIP group is larger than that of the NP group, while their irrelevants didn't show any significant difference. This means that the incongruent verbal priming did enhance the P300 CIT effect for the probe, which could further improve the accuracy of CTP for the concealed information test.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-66
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume148
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2020

Keywords

  • Complex trial protocol
  • ERP
  • Non-identical priming
  • P300

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The enhancing effect of incongruent verbal priming stimuli on the CIT effect with pictorial probes in the P300-based complex trial protocol'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this