The epidemiology of skin cancer by UV index: cross-sectional analysis from the 2019 behavioral risk factor surveillance survey

Trisha Kaundinya*, Roopal V. Kundu, Joe Feinglass

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The extent to which the Ultraviolet (UV) index is associated with the prevalence of melanoma and keratinocyte cancer in the United States is not clear. We conducted a cross-sectional study using the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) 2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) telephone interview survey to investigate the epidemiology of skin cancer in the US including age, household income, education, and marital and employment status. Of non-Hispanic white respondents, 9.6% (N = 29,925) reported a being told of a skin cancer diagnosis. The prevalence of skin cancer was significantly higher in high UV (> / = 8) states (11.8%, N = 36,575) than in medium UV (6–7) (9.0%, N = 27,812) and lower UV (< / = 5) (7.8%, N = 24,083) states (p <.0001). Respondents from a medium UV or high UV state had higher odds (1.21 [1.15–2.27], 1.55[1.47–1.63], respectively) of reporting a skin cancer diagnosis than those from a low UV state. The association of UV index with lifetime skin cancer prevalence reinforces the importance of educating patients on preventive practices such as avoidance of tanning beds and usage of UV protection with clothing and sunscreen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArchives of Dermatological Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Skin cancer
  • UV index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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