The future of biologics: Applications for food allergy

Rebecca N. Bauer, Monali Manohar, Anne Marie Singh, David C. Jay, Kari C. Nadeau*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Allergic diseases affect millions worldwide, with growing evidence of an increase in allergy occurrence over the past few decades. Current treatments for allergy include corticosteroids to reduce inflammation and allergen immunotherapy; however, some subjects experience treatment-resistant inflammation or adverse reactions to these treatments, and there are currently no approved therapeutics for the treatment of food allergy. There is a dire need for new therapeutic approaches for patients with poorly controlled atopic diseases and a need to improve the safety and effectiveness of allergen immunotherapy. Improved understanding of allergy through animal models and clinical trials has unveiled potential targets for new therapies, leading to the development of several biologics to treat allergic diseases. This review focuses on the mechanisms that contribute to allergy, with an emphasis on future targets for biologics for the treatment of food allergy. These biologics include immunotherapy with novel anti-IgE antibodies and analogs, small-molecule inhibitors of cell signaling, anti-type 2 cytokine mAbs, and TH1-promoting adjuvants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)312-323
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume135
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Keywords

  • Food allergy
  • allergen sensitization
  • anaphylaxis
  • anti-IgE
  • biologics
  • immunotherapy
  • oral tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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