The HELIX project: Overview and directions

Simone Campanoni*, Timothy Jones, Glenn Holloway, Gu Yeon Wei, David Brooks

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parallelism has become the primary way to maximize processor performance and power efficiency. But because creating parallel programs by hand is difficult and prone to error, there is an urgent need for automatic ways of transforming conventional programs to exploit modern multicore systems. The HELIX compiler transformation is one such technique that has proven effective at parallelizing individual sequential programs automatically for a real six-core processor. We describe that transformation in the context of the broader HELIX research project, which aims to optimize the throughput of a multicore processor by coordinated changes in its architecture, its compiler, and its operating system. The goal is to make automatic parallelization mainstream in multiprogramming settings through adaptive algorithms for extracting and tuning thread-level parallelism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 49th Annual Design Automation Conference, DAC '12
Pages277-282
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 11 2012
Event49th Annual Design Automation Conference, DAC '12 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 3 2012Jun 7 2012

Other

Other49th Annual Design Automation Conference, DAC '12
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period6/3/126/7/12

Keywords

  • coarse grain parallelism extraction
  • multiple programs
  • runtime code adaptability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Modeling and Simulation

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