The high-risk recipient: The Eighth Annual American Society of Transplant Surgeons' State-of-the-Art Winter Symposium

Randall S. Sung*, Elizabeth A. Pomfret, Kenneth A. Andreoni, Talia B. Baker, Thomas G. Peters

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The evolution of organ transplantation has produced results so successful that many transplant programs commonly see recipients with medical risks, which in the past, would have prohibited transplantation. The Eighth Annual American Society of Transplant Surgeons State-of-the-Art Winter Symposium focused on the high-risk recipient. The assessment of risk has evolved over time, as transplantation has matured. The acceptance of risk associated with a given candidate today is often made in consideration of the relative value of the organ to other candidates, the regulatory environment, and philosophical notions of utility, equity, and fairness. In addition, transplant programs must balance outcomes, transplant volume, and the costs of organ transplantation, which are impacted by high-risk recipients. Discussion focused on various types of high-risk recipients, such as those with coronary artery disease, morbid obesity, and hepatitis C; strategies to reduce risk, such as down-staging of hepatocellular carcinoma and treatment of pulmonary hypertension; the development of alternatives to transplantation; and the degree to which risk can or should be used to define candidate selection. These approaches can modify the impact of recipient risk on transplant outcomes and permit transplantation to be applied successfully to a greater variety of patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-28
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Keywords

  • Organ transplantation
  • Recipient risk
  • Transplant surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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