The Hispanic Paradox in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis: Current Evidence from a Large Regional Retrospective Cohort Study

Kofi Atiemo, Nikhilesh R. Mazumder, Juan C. Caicedo, Daniel Ganger, Elisa Gordon, Samantha Montag, Haripriya Maddur, Lisa B. VanWagner, Satyender Goel, Abel Kho, Michael Abecassis, Lihui Zhao, Daniela Ladner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Despite lower socioeconomic status, Hispanics in the United States paradoxically maintain equal or higher average survival rates compared to non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Methods. We used multivariable Cox regression to assess whether this "Hispanic paradox" applies to patients with liver cirrhosis using a retrospective cohort of twenty 121 patients in a Chicago-wide electronic health record database. Results. Our study population included 3279 (16%) Hispanics, 9150 (45%) NHW, 4432 (22%) African Americans, 529 (3%) Asians, and 2731 (14%) of other races/ethnic groups. Compared to Hispanics, NHW (hazard ratio [HR] 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.37), African American (HR 1.26; 95% CI, 1.15-1.39), and other races/ethnic groups (HR 1.55; 95% CI, 1.40-1.71) had an increased risk of death despite adjustment for age, sex, insurance status, etiology of cirrhosis, and comorbidities. On stratified analyses, a mortality advantage for Hispanics compared to NHW was seen for alcohol cirrhosis (HR for NHW 1.35; 95% CI, 1.19-1.52), hepatitis B (HR for NHW 1.35; 95% CI, 0.98-1.87), hepatitis C (HR for NHW 1.21; 95% CI, 1.06-1.38), and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (HR for NHW 1.14; 95% CI, 0.94-1.39). There was no advantage associated with Hispanic race over NHW in cases of hepatocellular carcinoma or cholestatic liver disease. Conclusions. Hispanic patients with cirrhosis experience a survival advantage over many other racial groups despite adjustment for multiple covariates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2531-2538
Number of pages8
JournalTransplantation
Volume103
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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