The Human Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Regulates Transcriptional Coactivator p300 Activity and Promotes Transcriptional Repression

Rui Hong, Debabrata Chakravarti*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chromatin structure plays an important role in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. p300 is a transcriptional coactivator with protein acetyltransferase activity, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays important roles in DNA replication and repair. It has been shown recently that p300 is necessary for DNA synthesis and repair. However, it is not known whether human PCNA, in a reciprocal manner, can regulate the enzymatic activity and transcriptional regulatory properties of p300. Here we show that human PCNA associates with p300 and potently inhibits the acetyltransferase activity and transcriptional activation properties of p300. Surprisingly, PCNA fails to inhibit p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) acetyltransferase function as well as PCAF-dependent transcription. Additionally, PCNA potently represses transcription when targeted to chromatin in vivo. Consistent with these observations, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate that PCNA recruitment to promoters causes hypoacetylation of chromatin. Together, our results demonstrate for the first time a novel role for human PCNA in transcriptional repression and in modulating chromatin modification. The reciprocal modulation of p300 and PCNA activities by each other provides an example of integrative regulatory cross-talk among chromatin-based processes such as DNA transcription, repair, and synthesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44505-44513
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume278
Issue number45
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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