The impact of behavioral and mental health risk assessments on goal setting in primary care

Alex H. Krist*, Russell E. Glasgow, Suzanne Heurtin-Roberts, Roy T. Sabo, Dylan H. Roby, Sherri N.Sheinfeld Gorin, Bijal A. Balasubramanian, Paul A. Estabrooks, Marcia G. Ory, Beth A. Glenn, Siobhan M. Phillips, Rodger Kessler, Sallie Beth Johnson, Catherine L. Rohweder, Maria E. Fernandez

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patient-centered health risk assessments (HRAs) that screen for unhealthy behaviors, prioritize concerns, and provide feedback may improve counseling, goal setting, and health. To evaluate the effectiveness of routinely administering a patient-centered HRA, My Own Health Report, for diet, exercise, smoking, alcohol, drug use, stress, depression, anxiety, and sleep, 18 primary care practices were randomized to ask patients to complete My Own Health Report (MOHR) before an office visit (intervention) or continue usual care (control). Intervention practice patients were more likely than control practice patients to be asked about each of eight risks (range of differences 5.3–15.8 %, p < 0.001), set goals for six risks (range of differences 3.8–16.6 %, p < 0.01), and improve five risks (range of differences 5.4–13.6 %, p < 0.01). Compared to controls, intervention patients felt clinicians cared more for them and showed more interest in their concerns. Patient-centered health risk assessments improve screening and goal setting. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01825746

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-219
Number of pages8
JournalTranslational behavioral medicine
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Fingerprint

Primary Health Care
Mental Health
Health
Office Visits
Counseling
Sleep
Anxiety
Smoking
Alcohols
Exercise
Depression
Diet
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Health behaviors
  • Health risk assessment
  • Mental health
  • Patient reported measures
  • Pragmatic trial
  • Primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Krist, A. H., Glasgow, R. E., Heurtin-Roberts, S., Sabo, R. T., Roby, D. H., Gorin, S. N. S., ... Fernandez, M. E. (2016). The impact of behavioral and mental health risk assessments on goal setting in primary care. Translational behavioral medicine, 6(2), 212-219. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13142-015-0384-2
Krist, Alex H. ; Glasgow, Russell E. ; Heurtin-Roberts, Suzanne ; Sabo, Roy T. ; Roby, Dylan H. ; Gorin, Sherri N.Sheinfeld ; Balasubramanian, Bijal A. ; Estabrooks, Paul A. ; Ory, Marcia G. ; Glenn, Beth A. ; Phillips, Siobhan M. ; Kessler, Rodger ; Johnson, Sallie Beth ; Rohweder, Catherine L. ; Fernandez, Maria E. / The impact of behavioral and mental health risk assessments on goal setting in primary care. In: Translational behavioral medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 212-219.
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Krist, AH, Glasgow, RE, Heurtin-Roberts, S, Sabo, RT, Roby, DH, Gorin, SNS, Balasubramanian, BA, Estabrooks, PA, Ory, MG, Glenn, BA, Phillips, SM, Kessler, R, Johnson, SB, Rohweder, CL & Fernandez, ME 2016, 'The impact of behavioral and mental health risk assessments on goal setting in primary care', Translational behavioral medicine, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 212-219. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13142-015-0384-2

The impact of behavioral and mental health risk assessments on goal setting in primary care. / Krist, Alex H.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Heurtin-Roberts, Suzanne; Sabo, Roy T.; Roby, Dylan H.; Gorin, Sherri N.Sheinfeld; Balasubramanian, Bijal A.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Ory, Marcia G.; Glenn, Beth A.; Phillips, Siobhan M.; Kessler, Rodger; Johnson, Sallie Beth; Rohweder, Catherine L.; Fernandez, Maria E.

In: Translational behavioral medicine, Vol. 6, No. 2, 01.06.2016, p. 212-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Krist, Alex H.

AU - Glasgow, Russell E.

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AU - Roby, Dylan H.

AU - Gorin, Sherri N.Sheinfeld

AU - Balasubramanian, Bijal A.

AU - Estabrooks, Paul A.

AU - Ory, Marcia G.

AU - Glenn, Beth A.

AU - Phillips, Siobhan M.

AU - Kessler, Rodger

AU - Johnson, Sallie Beth

AU - Rohweder, Catherine L.

AU - Fernandez, Maria E.

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