The impact of investigative reporting on public opinion and policymaking targeting toxic waste

David L. Protess*, Fay Lomax Cook, Thomas R. Curtin, Margaret T. Gordon, Donna R. Leff, Maxwell E. Mccombs, Peter Miller

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article reports the fourth in a continuing series of case studies that explore the impact of news media investigative journalism on the general public, policymakers, and public policy. The media disclosures in this field experiment had limited effects on the general public but were influential in changing the attitudes of policymakers. The study describes how changes in public policymaking resulted from collaboration between journalists and government officials. The authors develop a model that is a beginning step toward specifying the cond6itions under which media investigations influence public attitudes and agendas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-185
Number of pages20
JournalPublic Opinion Quarterly
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

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