The impact of minimum goals and aspirations on judgments of success in negotiations

Leigh Thompson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Experiment 1 examined the impact of minimum goals and aspiration values on feelings of success. Negotiators with low minimum goals felt more successful than did those with higher minimum goals, even though their final settlements were identical. Furthermore, negotiators with low aspirations felt more successful than did negotiators with higher aspirations, even though the final settlement was identical. Experiment 2 examined the relative impact of minimum goals and aspirations and found that aspirations influenced negotiators' perceptions of success more than did minimum goals. Experiment 3 examined how goals affected the demands negotiators made to their opponents. Negotiators with low minimum goals and high aspirations demanded more from their opponents than did negotiators with high minimum goals and low aspirations. In general, aspirations, as compared to minimum goals, exerted a more powerful influence on the demands people made to others in negotiations and how successful they felt about negotiated outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-524
Number of pages12
JournalGroup Decision and Negotiation
Volume4
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1995

Keywords

  • aspiration
  • comparison
  • goal
  • judgment
  • negotiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Decision Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Strategy and Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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