The impact of negotiation on intergroup relations

Leigh Thompson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three studies examined the impact of interpersonal conflict on intergroup relations. It was hypothesized that whereas all subjects were expected to show in-group bias merely as a consequence of social categorization, in-group favoritism would be greatly reduced among those who negotiated with an out-group member, but not for those who negotiated with an in-group member. The results supported the predictions: People who negotiated with a member of an out-group developed more favorable evaluations of the out-group whereas people who negotiated with a member of their own group were more likely to show in-group favoritism (Experiments 1 and 2). However, when the negotiation situation was such that negotiators could not reach a mutually beneficial agreement, the positive effects of interpersonal negotiation with members of out-groups on intergroup relations was not observed (Experiment 3). Thus, negotiation with members of out-groups improves intergroup relations when the negotiation situation is one in which both persons′ goals may be achieved. Whereas individuals who expected to negotiate with out-group members thought they would obtain significantly lower outcomes, there were no differences in terms of the value of the actual outcomes achieved for those who negotiated with an in-group member and those who negotiated with an out-group member.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-325
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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