The Impact of Pre-Stroke Depressive Symptoms, Fatalism, and Social Support on Disability after Stroke

Anjail Z. Sharrief, Brisa N. Sánchez, Lynda D. Lisabeth, Lesli E. Skolarus, Darin B. Zahuranec, Jonggyu Baek, Nelda Garcia, Erin Case, Lewis B. Morgenstern*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Psychological and social factors have been linked to stroke mortality; however, their impact on stroke disability is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of pre-stroke fatalism, depressive symptoms, and social support on 90-day neurologic, functional, and cognitive outcomes. Methods Ischemic strokes (2008-2011) were identified from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project. Validated scales were used to assess fatalism, depressive symptoms, and social support during baseline interviews. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, activities of daily living/instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL) scale, and Modified Mini-Mental State Exam (3MSE) were used to assess 90-day outcomes. The associations between the pre-stroke variables and 90-day outcomes were estimated from regression models adjusting for demographics, risk factors, tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment, and comorbidities. Results Among 364 stroke survivors, higher pre-stroke fatalism was associated with worse functional (.17 point higher ADL/IADL per interquartile range [IQR] higher fatalism; 95% confidence interval [CI]:.05,.30) and cognitive (2.81 point lower 3MSE per IQR higher fatalism; 95% CI:.95, 4.67) outcomes. Higher pre-stroke depressive symptoms were associated with worse functional (.16 point higher ADL/IADL per IQR higher Patient Health Questionnaire-9; 95% CI:.04,.28) and cognitive (2.28 point lower 3MSE per IQR higher Patient Health Questionnaire-9; 95% CI:.46, 4.10) outcomes. Participants in the middle tertile of social support had better cognitive outcomes (3.75 points higher 3MSE; 95% CI:.93, 6.56) compared with the highest tertile. Conclusions The associations between pre-stroke fatalism, depressive symptoms, and social support and 90-day outcomes suggest that psychosocial factors play an important role in stroke recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2686-2691
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Volume26
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Depression
  • disability
  • fatalism
  • social support
  • stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Impact of Pre-Stroke Depressive Symptoms, Fatalism, and Social Support on Disability after Stroke'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this