The impact of prior knowledge from participant instructions in a mock crime P300 Concealed Information Test

Michael R. Winograd*, J. Peter Rosenfeld

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

In P300-Concealed Information Tests used with mock crime scenarios, the amount of detail revealed to a participant prior to the commission of the mock crime can have a serious impact on a study's validity. We predicted that exposure to crime details through instructions would bias detection rates toward enhanced sensitivity. In a 2. ×. 2 factorial design, participants were either informed (through mock crime instructions) or naïve as to the identity of a to-be-stolen item, and then either committed (guilty) or did not commit (innocent) the crime. Results showed that prior knowledge of the stolen item was sufficient to cause 69% of innocent-informed participants to be incorrectly classified as guilty. Further, we found a trend toward enhanced detection rate for guilty-informed participants over guilty-naïve participants. Results suggest that revealing details to participants through instructions biases detection rates in the P300-CIT toward enhanced sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-481
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume94
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Keywords

  • Complex Trial Protocol
  • Concealed Information Test
  • ERP
  • Ecological validity
  • Mock crime
  • P300

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology (medical)

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