The impact of receiving an HIV diagnosis and cognitive processing on psychological distress and posttraumatic growth

Vienna R. Nightingale*, Tamara G. Sher, Nathan B. Hansen

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    54 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    This study examined human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a traumatic stressor, intrusive and deliberate cognitive processing, psychological distress, and posttraumatic growth. One-hundred twelve participants completed interviews on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Criterion A, Rumination Scale-Revised, Impact of Event Scale, and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory; relationships were modeled using path analysis. Model 1 attempted to replicate prior empirical research, Model 2 attempted to empirically replicate part of the posttraumatic growth theoretical model, and Model 3 attempted to empirically replicate an integrated model of posttraumatic growth and traumatic stress theories. Model 3 had good fit with study data. Results suggest shared and separate pathways from traumatic stressor to psychological distress and posttraumatic growth, with pathways mediated by cognitive processing. Implications of findings are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)452-460
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
    Volume23
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Clinical Psychology
    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of receiving an HIV diagnosis and cognitive processing on psychological distress and posttraumatic growth'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this