The impact of timing of exposure to violence on violent behavior in a high poverty sample of inner city African American youth

Richard Spano*, Craig Rivera, John Bolland

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

A growing body of research has linked exposure to violence to violent behavior, but few studies have examined the impact of the timing of exposure to violence on violent behavior among inner city, minority youth. Theoretical insights derived from developmental psychology and psychopathology (DPP) and Agnew's general strain theory (GST) give contrasting accounts of whether exposure to violence has a short term or long term impact on violent behavior. Five waves of data collected from African American youth living in twelve high poverty inner city neighborhoods was used to examine how the timing of exposure to violence over a four year time period impacts year five violent behavior. Multivariate results support GST's contention that more proximal exposure to violence has a larger impact on violent behavior. The theoretical and practical implications of the findings for adolescent development in high poverty settings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)681-692
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

Keywords

  • Cycle of violence
  • Exposure to violence
  • General strain theory
  • Inner city poverty
  • Victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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