The implicit assumptions of television research: An analysis of the 1982 NIMH report on Television and Behavior

Thomas D. Cook*, Deborah A. Kendzierski, Stephen V. Thomas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors analyze some of the assumptions underlying most current research on television. They emphasize the dependence on (1) an individual rather than an institutional level of analysis; (2) a model of research utilization that pays little explicit attention to where sources of leverage lie for changes in programming; (3) extremely simple models of the selection processes associated with different levels of television viewing; and (4) uncritical appraisals of the consequences of effects that many would call small or modest. These issues are illustrated by a general discussion of the NIMH report on Television and Behavior and specific discussion of "mainstreaming" and the effects of television violence.In 1972, POQ's editors invited Leo Bogart to prepare a extended review article of the Surgeon-Generars Study of Television and Social Behavior (POQ 36:491-521). When the 10-year follow-up study was released by NIMH in 1982, the editors asked Thomas D. Cook, a distinguished psychologist noted for his research on television, to perform the same function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-201
Number of pages41
JournalPublic Opinion Quarterly
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1983

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The implicit assumptions of television research: An analysis of the 1982 NIMH report on Television and Behavior'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this