The induction of tolerance to DNFB contact sensitivity by using hapten-modified lymphoid cells. III. Effects of hapten concentration on the ability of MLS-disparate cells to induce rapid unresponsiveness

P. J. Conlon, S. D. Miller, H. N. Claman

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9 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated genetic restrictions in the induction of immediate tolerance to DNFB contact sensitivity in mice. Using spleen cells from various donor strains haptenated at 500 μM DNFB, we were unable to detect any restrictions in tolerance induction in recipients that were either syngeneic or allogeneic to the donor strain. However, if the concentration of hapten used in the in vitro labeling was decreased (from 500 μM to 2.5 to 5 μM DNFB), differences in tolerogenesis between the various donor strain haplotypes were found. Haptenated spleen cells labeled with 5 μM DNFB produced a profound level of unresponsiveness in allogeneic recipients but produced minimal tolerance in syngeneic animals. This tolerant state was shown to be antigen-specific and was not produced by unmodified allogeneic cells alone. Further genetic analysis demonstrated that an efficient tolerant state was produced when the donor of the tolerogen and recipient differed at the MLS locus rather than at either the MHC or minor regions. This phenomenon required viable, Thy 1-bearing cells in the haptenated donor population for efficient tolerogenesis to DNFB contact sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)807-813
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume125
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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