The influence of weight-related variables on smoking cessation

J. Scott Mizes, Denise M. Sloan, Kathleen Segraves, Bonnie Spring, Regina Pingitore, Jean Kristeller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recently, researchers have suggested the possible importance of weight- related variables, particularly among women, in relapse to smoking. The present study prospectively examined the prediction of success versus failure (both relapse and dropout) in a smoking-cessation program using several weight-related variables and gender. Weight-related variables accounted for a significant amount of variance in the prediction of dropout from a cessation program. The interaction of gender with Body Mass Index (BMI) and gender with concern about postcessation weight gain also accounted for a significant amount of variance in dropout. Particularly, women who were lower in weight and women who were concerned about postcessation weight gain were more likely to drop out of a cessation program before completion than the other participants in the study. Results also indicated that people who have chronic weight concern and gain weight during a cessation attempt were more likely to drop out of a cessation program before completion than individuals with chronic weight concern and little to no weight gain during the quit attempt. Prediction of relapse to smoking during the cessation program was not very revealing. One finding that did emerge was that, among those who completed the study and did not drop out, men were twice as likely to relapse as were women. These results indicate the importance of weight-related variables, particularly among women, in the prediction of success in a cessation program. Findings also suggest that dropout may be more revealing in predicting failure in a cessation program than relapse to smoking in terms of the influence of weight-related issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-385
Number of pages15
JournalBehavior Therapy
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The influence of weight-related variables on smoking cessation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this