The interaction of sexual identity with sexual behavior and its influence on HIV risk among Latino men: Results of a community survey in northern San Diego County, California

Jennifer A. Zellner, Ana P. Martínez-Donate, Fernando Sañudo, Araceli Fernández-Cerdeño, Carol L. Sipan, Melbourne F. Hovell, Héctor Carrillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the sexual behavior, sexual identities, and HIV risk factors of a community sample of Latino men to inform efforts to reduce Latinos' HIV risk. Methods. In 2005 and 2006, 680 Latino men in San Diego County, California, in randomly selected, targeted community venues, completed an anonymous, self-administered survey. Results. Most (92.3%) respondents self-identified as heterosexual, with 2.2%, 4.9%, and 0.6% self-identifying as bisexual, gay, or other orientation, respectively. Overall, 4.8% of heterosexually identified men had a lifetime history of anal intercourse with other men. Compared with behaviorally heterosexual men, heterosexually identified men who had sex with both men and women were more likely to have had a sexually transmitted infection, to have unprotected sexual intercourse with female partners, and to report having sex while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. Bisexually identified men who had sex with men and women did not differ from behaviorally heterosexual men in these risk factors. Conclusions. Latino men who have a heterosexual identity and bisexual practices are at greater risk of HIV infection, and efforts to reduce HIV risk among Latinos should target this group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-132
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume99
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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