The low‐output carbon dioxide laser for cutaneous wound closure of scalpel incisions: Comparative tensile strength studies of the laser to the suture and staple for wound closure

Jerome M. Garden*, June K Robinson, P. Marie Taute, Eugene P. Lautenschlager, S. Joseph Leibovich, Renee S. Hartz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

The low‐output carbon dioxide (CO2) laser was used for cutaneous wound closure of scalpel incisions. Cutaneous scalpel incisions were placed over the dorsum of three minipigs and were then closed by either the laser, sutures, or staples. At multiple time points after wound closure, up to day 90, the tensile strengths of these wounds were comparatively evaluated. All wounds, including those closed with the laser, clinically appeared to heal similarly with no evidence of wound dehiscence or infection. Tensile strength studies revealed similar sigmoid curves for all wound closure modalities with low initial tensile strengths up to days 14 to 21, which afterwards increased rapidly, with a plateau toward day 90. From our study, it appears that the CO2 laser, in the low‐output mode, can be used for cutaneous wound closure and that similar clinical healing and tensile strength measurements are obtained relative to the conventional cutaneous wound closure modalities of the suture or staple.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-71
Number of pages5
JournalLasers in Surgery and Medicine
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

Keywords

  • low‐output carbon dioxide laser
  • tensile strength
  • wound closure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

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