The misidentification of bacterial genes as human cDNAs: Was the human D-1 tumor antigen gene acquired from bacteria?

Eric P. Skaar, H. Steven Seifert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The initial analysis of the draft copy of the human genome sequence revealed the presence of several genes that were proposed to have been directly transferred from bacteria. We investigated the human D-1 antigen as a potential lateral transfer event. We report that although the human D-1 antigen seems to be an excellent candidate for lateral transfer, it is a contaminating bacterial sequence present in a human cDNA library that was included in the human genome analysis. Furthermore, several other genes present in the publicly available databases that were included in the analysis of the human genome are also likely contaminating bacterial sequences present in cDNA libraries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)625-627
Number of pages3
JournalGenomics
Volume79
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

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