The neuropsychological profile of Alzheimer disease

Sandra Weintraub*, Alissa H. Wicklund, David P. Salmon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

297 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neuropsychological assessment has featured prominently over the past 30 years in the characterization of dementia associated with Alzheimer disease (AD). Clinical neuropsychological methods have identified the earliest, most definitive cognitive and behavioral symptoms of illness, contributing to the identification, staging, and tracking of disease. With increasing public awareness of dementia, disease detection has moved to earlier stages of illness, at a time when deficits are both behaviorally and pathologically selective. For reasons that are not well understood, early AD pathology frequently targets large-scale neuroanatomical networks for episodic memory before other networks that subserve language, attention, executive functions, and visuospatial abilities. This chapter reviews the pathognomonic neuropsychological features of AD dementia and how these differ from "normal," age-related cognitive decline and from other neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia, including cortical Lewy body disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and cerebrovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbera006171
JournalCold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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