The "outer limits" of oblivion

Jeffrey A Sconce*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a medium already renowned for its intrusive presence in the American home, few television shows have featured opening credit sequences as calculatedly invasive as that of The Outer Limits. A narrational entity known only as the "control voice" opened each week's episode with these unnerving words of assurance: There is nothing wrong with your television set.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Revolution Wasn't Televised
Subtitle of host publicationSixties Television and Social Conflict
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages21-45
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9781135205409
ISBN (Print)0415911214, 9780415911214
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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television show
television
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Sconce, J. A. (2013). The "outer limits" of oblivion. In The Revolution Wasn't Televised: Sixties Television and Social Conflict (pp. 21-45). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203700426-7
Sconce, Jeffrey A. / The "outer limits" of oblivion. The Revolution Wasn't Televised: Sixties Television and Social Conflict. Taylor and Francis, 2013. pp. 21-45
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Sconce, JA 2013, The "outer limits" of oblivion. in The Revolution Wasn't Televised: Sixties Television and Social Conflict. Taylor and Francis, pp. 21-45. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203700426-7

The "outer limits" of oblivion. / Sconce, Jeffrey A.

The Revolution Wasn't Televised: Sixties Television and Social Conflict. Taylor and Francis, 2013. p. 21-45.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Sconce JA. The "outer limits" of oblivion. In The Revolution Wasn't Televised: Sixties Television and Social Conflict. Taylor and Francis. 2013. p. 21-45 https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203700426-7