The politics of AIDS, condoms, and heterosexual relations in Africa: Recent evidence from the local print media

Caroline Bledsoe*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The presence of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in Africa has triggered enormous international concern. The AIDS epidemic has begun to exacerbate existing social and political tensions, leading to panic reactions that scapegoat vulnerable groups. One of the most important factors underlying the marriage process is economics. Despite other sentiments influencing heterosexual relations such as affection, sexual desire, and the possibility of engendering children, most women depend on economic contributions from men. The main effect of the AIDS crisis on stable partner relationships appears to be that it deepens suspicions—a cause of much conjugal anguish, but one that has intensified enormously. Concerning the effects of AIDS on children, most media attention has been devoted to children who contract Human Immunodeficiency Virus in the womb. The chapter concludes that despite the difficulties that condoms pose, persistent effortsto introduce them as part of AIDS education packages in secondary schools make sense according to some important cultural logic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBirths and Power
Subtitle of host publicationSocial Change and the Politics of Reproduction
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages197-223
Number of pages27
ISBN (Electronic)9780429693922
ISBN (Print)0813377870, 9780367013257
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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