The PPET study: People and pets exercising together

Robert F. Kushner*, Dawn Jackson Blatner, Dennis E. Jewell, Kimberly Rudloff

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Obesity is a significant public health problem that is affecting people and their pets. The human-companion animal bond and the role of pets in providing social support provides a rationale framework for studying the effectiveness of a combined people and pets (PP) exercising together (PPET) weight loss program. Research Methods and Procedures: Thirty-six pairs of overweight or obese people with an obese pet (PP) and 56 overweight or obese people only (PO) participated in a 1-year prospective controlled weight loss study. In a group format, people received dietary and physical activity counseling, and dogs were fed a calorie-controlled prescription diet. Physical activity was recorded using the physical activity recall questionnaire. Results: Completion rates at 1 year were 61% for the PP group and 58% for the PO group. Mean weight losses at 12 months using last observation carried forward were 4.7% (PP) and 5.2% (PO). Mean weight loss among the dogs was 15%. Time spent in physical activity increased in both groups to 3.9 (PP) and 3.5 (PO) h/wk. Two-thirds of total physical activity in the PP group was spent with the dogs. Discussion: The PPET study is the first program to demonstrate the effectiveness of a combined PP weight loss program. This fresh approach to the dual obesity epidemic builds on the human-companion animal bond. Consideration of social support for weight loss of family members, friends, and coworkers should be extended to include pets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1762-1770
Number of pages9
JournalObesity
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

Keywords

  • Companion animals
  • Physical activity
  • Social support
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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    Kushner, R. F., Blatner, D. J., Jewell, D. E., & Rudloff, K. (2006). The PPET study: People and pets exercising together. Obesity, 14(10), 1762-1770. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.203