The predictive value of changes in serologic and cell markers of HIV activity for subsequent clinical outcome in patients with asymptomatic HIV disease treated with zidovudine

Mark A. Jacobson*, Victor De Gruttola, Mohan Reddy, Jean Marie Arduino, Scott Strickland, Richard C. Reichman, John A. Bartlett, John P. Phair, Martin S. Hirsch, Ann C. Collier, Ruy Soeiro, Paul Volberding

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine if serologic marker responses to zidovudine treatment during the first year of antiretroviral therapy could predict subsequent HIV disease progression independently of absolute CD4 lymphocyte responses. Methods: We conducted a case-control study in patients with asymptomatic HIV disease, who were initiating zidovudine therapy in a randomized, prospective trial. A total of 102 patients who progressed to AIDS or advanced AIDS-related complex and 177 randomly selected controls matched by baseline CD4 cell count and duration of follow-up had serum samples (from prior to and at 8, 16, 32 and 48 weeks of zidovudine treatment) assayed for acid-disassociated HIV p24 antigen, β2-microglobulin (β2M), neopterin, soluble interleukin (IL)-2 receptor, soluble CD4 protein and soluble CD8 protein. Results: Median time to event for cases was 20.2 months; median follow-up on study was 35.4 months for controls. After controlling for absolute CD4 count at baseline, increased baseline serum concentrations of HIV p24 antigen, β2M, neopterin, and soluble IL-2 receptor were highly predictive of increased risk of HIV disease progression. In a multiple logistic regression model, controlling for baseline marker values, change in β2M consistently added independent value to change in CD4 count in predicting subsequent risk of disease progression. Conclusions: Monitoring serum immunologic markers, in particular β2M, in addition to absolute CD4 lymphocyte counts prior to and within the first 4 months after initiating dideoxynucleoside therapy can increase the accuracy of estimations of subsequent long-term risk of clinical HIV disease progression. This information may be useful to clinicians and patients who are making decisions about initiating or changing antiretroviral therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-734
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1995

Keywords

  • Neopterin
  • Zidovudine
  • β-microglobulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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