The presumed influence of election misinformation on others reduces our own satisfaction with democracy

Erik C. Nisbet, Chloe Mortenson, Qin Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pervasive political misinformation threatens the integrity of American electoral democracy but not in the manner most commonly examined. We argue the presumed influence of misinformation (PIM) may be just as pernicious, and widespread, as any direct influence that political misinformation may have on voters. Our online survey of 2,474 respondents in the United States shows that greater attention to political news heightens PIM on others as opposed to oneself, especially among Democrats and Independents. In turn, PIM on others reduces satisfaction with American electoral democracy, eroding the “virtuous circle” between news and democracy, and possibly commitment to democracy in the long-term.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHarvard Kennedy School Misinformation Review
Volume1
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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