The prevalence of loneliness among U.S. Chinese older adults

Melissa A. Simon*, E. Shien Chang, Manrui Zhang, Jenny Ruan, XinQi Dong

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Loneliness is an important indicator of well-being. However, we have limited understanding of loneliness in minority aging populations. This study aims to identify the prevalence of loneliness among U.S. Chinese older adults. Method: Data were drawn from the PINE study, a population-based study of 3,159 U.S. Chinese older adults in the Greater Chicago area. Results: Our findings indicated that the prevalence of loneliness was 26.2%. Older adults with older age, female gender, and living alone reported higher prevalence of loneliness. Older adults with worsened health status, poorer quality of life, and negative health changes over the past year were also more likely to experience loneliness. Discussion: Loneliness is common among U.S. Chinese older adults in the Greater Chicago area. Future longitudinal studies are needed to improve the understanding of risk factors and outcomes associated with loneliness in Chinese older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1172-1188
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of aging and health
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

Keywords

  • older adults
  • population studies
  • psychological distress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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