The psychophysiology of attribution: Why appreciative respect can keep us safe

Linda L Emanuel*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Questions about our potential to commit atrocities like those in the Nazis’ human subjects research may be unwelcome to medical professionals who are comfortable in today’s society. Our reliance on medical professionals’ advocacy for vulnerable people and vulnerable values, and on informed consent and institutional approval for research, may not necessarily prevent abuse of human subjects. For example, real research is being conducted under the guise of quality improvement, for which informed consent is not required, and patients may unknowingly suffer as a result.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHuman Subjects Research After the Holocaust
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages247-254
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9783319057026
ISBN (Print)9783319057019
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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  • Cite this

    Emanuel, L. L. (2014). The psychophysiology of attribution: Why appreciative respect can keep us safe. In Human Subjects Research After the Holocaust (pp. 247-254). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-05702-6_20