The relation of change in hostility and sociability during childhood to substance use in mid adolescence

Sarah E. Hampson*, Elizabeth Tildesley, Judy A. Andrews, Koen Luyckx, Daniel K. Mroczek

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a cohort-sequential longitudinal study (N=1075), we related change in children's hostility and sociability assessed from 1st to 8th grade to their use of cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana assessed from 9th to 12th grade. Children who were more hostile at 1st grade, and had higher rates of growth of hostility, used more of all three substances at 9th grade, and those with higher initial levels of hostility increased their use of cigarettes and marijuana from 9th to 12th grade. Children who were more sociable at 1st grade used more alcohol at 9th grade. These findings demonstrate the significance of individual differences in the development of personality traits for the prediction of later substance use and have implications for prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-114
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Adolescent substance use
  • Hostility
  • Sociability
  • Trait change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

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