The relevance of micro places to citywide robbery trends: A longitudinal analysis of robbery incidents at street corners and block faces in Boston

Anthony A. Braga, David M. Hureau, Andrew V. Papachristos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

124 Scopus citations

Abstract

Robbery, and the fear it inspires, has a profound effect on the quality of life in certain urban neighborhoods. Recent advances in criminological research suggest that there is significant clustering of crime in micro places, or hot spots,that generate a disproportionate amount of criminal events in a city. In this article, the authors use growth curve regression models to uncover distinctive developmental trends in robbery incidents at street segments and intersections in Boston over a 29-year period. The authors find that robberies are highly concentrated at a small number of street segments and intersections rather than spread evenly across the urban landscape over the study time period. Roughly 1 percent and 8 percent of street segments and intersections in Boston are responsible for nearly 50 percent of all commercial robberies and 66 percent of all street robberies, respectively, between 1980 and 2008. Our findings suggest that citywide robbery trends may be best understood by examining micro-level trends at a relatively small number of places in urban environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-32
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Research in Crime and Delinquency
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

Keywords

  • crime places
  • crime trends
  • hot spots
  • robbery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The relevance of micro places to citywide robbery trends: A longitudinal analysis of robbery incidents at street corners and block faces in Boston'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this