The role of acidic phosphoproteins in biomineralization

Keith Alvares*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biomineralization is the process by which living organisms deposit mineral in the extracellular matrix. In nature, almost 50% of biominerals are calcium-bearing minerals. In addition to calcium, we find biominerals formed from silica and magnetite. Calcium-containing biominerals could be either calcium phosphate as in apatite found in vertebrates or calcium carbonate as in calcite and aragonite found in many invertebrates. Since all biomineralization is matrix mediated, an understanding of the nature of the proteins involved is essential in elucidating its mechanism. This review will discuss some of the proteins involved in the process of biomineralization involving calcium. Two proteins, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin phosphoprotein (Phosphophoryn) will serve as models for the vertebrate system, and two others-P16 and phosphodontin will serve as models for the invertebrate system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-40
Number of pages7
JournalConnective tissue research
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Biomineralization
Phosphoproteins
Calcium Carbonate
Calcium
Invertebrates
Minerals
Vertebrates
Proteins
Bearings (structural)
Ferrosoferric Oxide
Apatites
Mineral resources
Dentin
Silicon Dioxide
Extracellular Matrix
dentin sialophosphoprotein

Keywords

  • DMP1
  • DSPP
  • Phosphodontin
  • Sea urchin P16

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Biochemistry
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

@article{a0a766ed75a44003a4312f425764540e,
title = "The role of acidic phosphoproteins in biomineralization",
abstract = "Biomineralization is the process by which living organisms deposit mineral in the extracellular matrix. In nature, almost 50{\%} of biominerals are calcium-bearing minerals. In addition to calcium, we find biominerals formed from silica and magnetite. Calcium-containing biominerals could be either calcium phosphate as in apatite found in vertebrates or calcium carbonate as in calcite and aragonite found in many invertebrates. Since all biomineralization is matrix mediated, an understanding of the nature of the proteins involved is essential in elucidating its mechanism. This review will discuss some of the proteins involved in the process of biomineralization involving calcium. Two proteins, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin phosphoprotein (Phosphophoryn) will serve as models for the vertebrate system, and two others-P16 and phosphodontin will serve as models for the invertebrate system.",
keywords = "DMP1, DSPP, Phosphodontin, Sea urchin P16",
author = "Keith Alvares",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3109/03008207.2013.867336",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "34--40",
journal = "Connective Tissue Research",
issn = "0300-8207",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "1",

}

The role of acidic phosphoproteins in biomineralization. / Alvares, Keith.

In: Connective tissue research, Vol. 55, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 34-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of acidic phosphoproteins in biomineralization

AU - Alvares, Keith

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Biomineralization is the process by which living organisms deposit mineral in the extracellular matrix. In nature, almost 50% of biominerals are calcium-bearing minerals. In addition to calcium, we find biominerals formed from silica and magnetite. Calcium-containing biominerals could be either calcium phosphate as in apatite found in vertebrates or calcium carbonate as in calcite and aragonite found in many invertebrates. Since all biomineralization is matrix mediated, an understanding of the nature of the proteins involved is essential in elucidating its mechanism. This review will discuss some of the proteins involved in the process of biomineralization involving calcium. Two proteins, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin phosphoprotein (Phosphophoryn) will serve as models for the vertebrate system, and two others-P16 and phosphodontin will serve as models for the invertebrate system.

AB - Biomineralization is the process by which living organisms deposit mineral in the extracellular matrix. In nature, almost 50% of biominerals are calcium-bearing minerals. In addition to calcium, we find biominerals formed from silica and magnetite. Calcium-containing biominerals could be either calcium phosphate as in apatite found in vertebrates or calcium carbonate as in calcite and aragonite found in many invertebrates. Since all biomineralization is matrix mediated, an understanding of the nature of the proteins involved is essential in elucidating its mechanism. This review will discuss some of the proteins involved in the process of biomineralization involving calcium. Two proteins, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin phosphoprotein (Phosphophoryn) will serve as models for the vertebrate system, and two others-P16 and phosphodontin will serve as models for the invertebrate system.

KW - DMP1

KW - DSPP

KW - Phosphodontin

KW - Sea urchin P16

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84892699422&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84892699422&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/03008207.2013.867336

DO - 10.3109/03008207.2013.867336

M3 - Article

C2 - 24437603

AN - SCOPUS:84892699422

VL - 55

SP - 34

EP - 40

JO - Connective Tissue Research

JF - Connective Tissue Research

SN - 0300-8207

IS - 1

ER -