The role of CD95 and CD95 ligand in cancer

M. E. Peter*, A. Hadji, A. E. Murmann, S. Brockway, W. Putzbach, A. Pattanayak, P. Ceppi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

135 Scopus citations

Abstract

CD95 (Fas/APO-1) and its ligand, CD95L, have long been viewed as a death receptor/death ligand system that mediates apoptosis induction to maintain immune homeostasis. In addition, these molecules are important in the immune elimination of virus-infected cells and cancer cells. CD95L was, therefore, considered to be useful for cancer therapy. However, major side effects have precluded its systemic use. During the last 10 years, it has been recognized that CD95 and CD95L have multiple cancer-relevant nonapoptotic and tumor-promoting activities. CD95 and CD95L were discovered to be critical survival factors for cancer cells, and were found to protect and promote cancer stem cells. We now discuss five different ways in which inhibiting or eliminating CD95L, rather than augmenting, may be beneficial for cancer therapy alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy or immune therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-559
Number of pages11
JournalCell Death and Differentiation
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 4 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The role of CD95 and CD95 ligand in cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this