The Role of Communication Technologies in Serial Arguments: A Communicative Interdependence Perspective

Kimberly B. Pusateri*, David J. Roaché, Ningxin Wang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

In response to scholars who recommend additional research concerning the role of communication technologies in relational conflict, we employ the communicative interdependence perspective (Caughlin & Sharabi, 2013) to explore mode integration and segmentation during serial arguments. More specifically, we found that technologically-mediated communication (TMC) and face-to-face (FtF) communication are commonly integrated during serial arguments. Mode integration was especially likely when serial arguments were seen as serious, relationally threatening, and less resolvable. Yet, integration of TMC and FtF communication and integration of multiple TMC channels during serial arguments were negatively associated with relational closeness and satisfaction for dating partners. Segmentation to one mode was rare and was not associated with relational satisfaction or closeness. We discuss the implications of these findings for the communicative interdependence perspective and our understanding of serial arguments in relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-60
Number of pages17
JournalArgumentation and Advocacy
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • communicative interdependence
  • conflict
  • serial arguments
  • technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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