The role of computerized tomography-myelography in a patient with spontaneous intracranial hypotension from multiple cerebrospinal fluid leaks

Honorio T Benzon*, Rasha S. Jabri, Matthew T. Walker, Eric T. Mizuno, Christopher J. Huser

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To describe a patient with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) secondary to multiple sites of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, a rarely described phenomenon. To compare computerized tomography-myelography with radionuclide cisternography as confirmatory diagnostic aids in SIH. METHODS: A patient with SIH had transient or no response to 2 thoracic epidural blood patches. A computerized tomography-myelography showed bilateral CSF leaks at T11-T12 and T12-L1 levels and on the left side of T10-T11. RESULTS: A left paramedian epidural blood patch was performed at T12-L1 under fluoroscopy guidance. Injection of 1 mL dye showed confinement of the dye at the left T11-L1 epidural space. The patient had 90% to 95% relief of her headache and complete relief at 4 months. She was asymptomatic 1 year after the last epidural blood patch. CONCLUSIONS: In a patient with SIH, a computerized tomography-myelography should be performed if an initial epidural blood patch is ineffective. This is to show the vertebral level and site(s) of CSF leak and to guide the physician to the ideal vertebral level for the epidural blood patch.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-833
Number of pages3
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

Keywords

  • Computerized tomography-myelography
  • Epidural blood patch
  • Headache
  • Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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