The role of cultural forms in tangible interaction design

Michael S. Horn*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

I suggest an approach to tangible interaction design that builds on social and cultural foundations. Specifically, I propose that designers can evoke cultural forms as a means to tap into users' existing cognitive, physical, and emotional resources. The emphasis is less on improving the usability of an interface and more on improving the overall experience around an interactive artifact by cueing productive patterns of social activity. My use of the term cultural form is derived from the work of Geoffrey Saxe and his form-function shift framework. This framework describes a process through which individuals appropriate cultural forms and restructure them to serve new functions in light of shifting goals and expectations. I describe Saxe's framework and then illustrate the use of cultural forms in design with three examples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTEI 2013 - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction
Pages117-124
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 2013
Event7th ACM International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2013 - Barcelona, Spain
Duration: Feb 10 2013Feb 13 2013

Other

Other7th ACM International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2013
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period2/10/132/13/13

Keywords

  • Cultural forms
  • Design
  • Tangible interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction

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