The role of extracellular matrix proteins in neural stem cell migration and traumatic brain injury

A basis for novel tissue engineering strategies

Matthew C. Tate*, Clara L. Caltagirone, David R. Archer, Andrés J. García, Michelle C. LaPlaca

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The ability of donor cells to adhere and migrate ECM proteins as a primary component for tissue-engineered constructs in the injured brain was investigated. Primary FGF2-responsive neural stem cells adhered and migrated on FN and LN under serum-free conditions with respect to collagens, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, poly-L-lysine, and uncoated tissue culture polystyrene. FN and LN immunoreactivity was increased in injured brains, adjacent to the brain cavity on day 1 after injury. The results showed significant increases in survival and migration distance in the transplant. It was suggested that tissue engineering utilizing neural stem cells cultured on an ECM-based scaffold can provide a novel strategy for influencing transplants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThird Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Translating Tissue Engineering into Products
Number of pages1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
EventThird Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Translating Tissue Engineering into Products - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Oct 13 2002Oct 16 2002

Other

OtherThird Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Translating Tissue Engineering into Products
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period10/13/0210/16/02

Fingerprint

Stem cells
Tissue engineering
Military electronic countermeasures
Brain
Transplants
Proteins
Tissue culture
Collagen
Scaffolds
Polystyrenes
Tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Tate, M. C., Caltagirone, C. L., Archer, D. R., García, A. J., & LaPlaca, M. C. (2002). The role of extracellular matrix proteins in neural stem cell migration and traumatic brain injury: A basis for novel tissue engineering strategies. In Third Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Translating Tissue Engineering into Products [CT-3]
Tate, Matthew C. ; Caltagirone, Clara L. ; Archer, David R. ; García, Andrés J. ; LaPlaca, Michelle C. / The role of extracellular matrix proteins in neural stem cell migration and traumatic brain injury : A basis for novel tissue engineering strategies. Third Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Translating Tissue Engineering into Products. 2002.
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Tate, MC, Caltagirone, CL, Archer, DR, García, AJ & LaPlaca, MC 2002, The role of extracellular matrix proteins in neural stem cell migration and traumatic brain injury: A basis for novel tissue engineering strategies. in Third Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Translating Tissue Engineering into Products., CT-3, Third Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Translating Tissue Engineering into Products, Atlanta, GA, United States, 10/13/02.

The role of extracellular matrix proteins in neural stem cell migration and traumatic brain injury : A basis for novel tissue engineering strategies. / Tate, Matthew C.; Caltagirone, Clara L.; Archer, David R.; García, Andrés J.; LaPlaca, Michelle C.

Third Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Translating Tissue Engineering into Products. 2002. CT-3.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - The ability of donor cells to adhere and migrate ECM proteins as a primary component for tissue-engineered constructs in the injured brain was investigated. Primary FGF2-responsive neural stem cells adhered and migrated on FN and LN under serum-free conditions with respect to collagens, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, poly-L-lysine, and uncoated tissue culture polystyrene. FN and LN immunoreactivity was increased in injured brains, adjacent to the brain cavity on day 1 after injury. The results showed significant increases in survival and migration distance in the transplant. It was suggested that tissue engineering utilizing neural stem cells cultured on an ECM-based scaffold can provide a novel strategy for influencing transplants.

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Tate MC, Caltagirone CL, Archer DR, García AJ, LaPlaca MC. The role of extracellular matrix proteins in neural stem cell migration and traumatic brain injury: A basis for novel tissue engineering strategies. In Third Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Translating Tissue Engineering into Products. 2002. CT-3