The role of neurofilament aggregation in neurodegeneration: Lessons from rare inherited neurological disorders

Alessandro Didonna, Puneet Opal*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, are well known to involve the accumulation of disease-specific proteins. Less well known are the accumulations of another set of proteins, neuronal intermediate filaments (NFs), which have been observed in these diseases for decades. NFs belong to the family of cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins (IFs) that give cells their shape; they determine axonal caliber, which controls signal conduction; and they regulate the transport of synaptic vesicles and modulate synaptic plasticity by binding to neurotransmitter receptors. In the last two decades, a number of rare disorders caused by mutations in genes that encode NFs or regulate their metabolism have been discovered. These less prevalent disorders are providing novel insights into the role of NF aggregation in the more common neurological disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number19
JournalMolecular neurodegeneration
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 16 2019

Keywords

  • Charcot-Marie-tooth (CMT) disease
  • Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN)
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Neurofilaments
  • Protein aggregation
  • Protein degradation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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