The role of personal contact with HIV-infected people in explaining urban, African American preadolescents' attitudes toward peers with HIV/AIDS

Miriam Schiff, Mary McKay*, Carl Bell, Donna Baptiste, Sybil Madison, Roberta Paikoff

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article presents the results of a study aimed at describing African American youths' attitudes toward peers with HIV/AIDS and identifying correlates of these attitudes based on the contact theory. Baseline data from a sample of African American, urban mothers and their youth (n = 197) participating in a family-based HIV prevention program were analyzed. In support of contact theory, preadolescents' close relationship to persons infected with HIV/AIDS was highly related to their attitudes. However, no relationship was found between maternal attitudes or communication variables and youth attitudes. The implications of youths' experience with persons with HIV/AIDS as part of prevention programming are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-108
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Volume73
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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