The rotten carrot: US-Turkish bargaining failure over Iraq in 2003 and the pitfalls of social embeddedness

Marina E. Henke*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Side-payments are commonly used in international relations to alter the foreign policies of states. Despite their frequent usage, however, our understanding is very limited as to why certain sidepayment negotiations succeed, while others fail. This article tries to remedy this shortcoming. It argues that social embeddedness between actors involved in the negotiations has a major bearing on bargaining outcomes. Under ideal circumstances, social relationships can be used to reduce information asymmetries and increase trust. But in the presence of fractured social networks, social ties can foster information bias and distrust, ultimately increasing the likelihood of bargaining failure. The US-Turkish bargaining failure over the Iraq intervention in 2003 is used to illustrate and test this theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-147
Number of pages28
JournalSecurity Studies
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

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