The “Scary World” of the nonviewer and other anomalies: A Reanalysis of Gerbner et al.'s Findings on Cultivation Analysis: Part I

Paul M. Hirsch*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

178 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article critically examines the statistical evidence presented by Gerbner et al. to support their assertion that television-viewing “cultivates” distorted perceptions of the “real world.” In Part I, I point out discrepancies in the items, samples, and coding categories employed, and show that when controls are applied simultaneously (rather than singly) there is no linear relationship between amount of viewing and the provision of “television answers.” This reanalysis concludes that the “cultivation” hypothesis lacks empirical support and that the very data presented in its support argue strongly for rejecting the assertion that it has any scientific basis in fact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-456
Number of pages54
JournalCommunication Research
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

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