The self-rating of the effects of alcohol questionnaire predicts heavy episodic drinking in a high-risk eating disorder population

Aimee Zhang*, Aaron J. Fisher, Jakki O. Bailey, Andrea E. Kass, Denise E. Wilfley, C. Barr Taylor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Heavy episodic drinking (HED) is a serious problem among college women at high-risk for developing eating disorders (EDs). The main objectives of this study are to determine the relationship of the self-rating of the effects of alcohol (SRE) questionnaire and HED over time, and to determine the effects of relationship breakups on HED among college-aged women at high-risk for EDs. Method: Data collected from 163 participants in a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of an ED prevention program were used in the analyses. Measures included the SRE, obtained at baseline, and self-reports of the number of HED episodes and relationship breakups each month for the past 12 months. Results: Generalized linear mixed-effect regression models with Poisson distribution were conducted to test the effects of several variables on reported HED episodes over 12 months. Analyses demonstrated that SRE scores and the presence of a breakup predicted increased HED over time. Discussion: The SRE may be useful in identifying individuals at risk of or with EDs who are at increased risk of HED. Furthermore, relationship breakups predict HED. Findings from the current study could be used to inform clinical interventions for this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-336
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Keywords

  • SRE
  • alcohol
  • college women
  • heavy episodic drinking
  • high-risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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