THE SOCIAL EMBEDDEDNESS OF CRIME AND UNEMPLOYMENT

JOHN HAGAN*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

202 Scopus citations

Abstract

A missing piece in the literature that links crime and unemployment is an understanding of the proximate causes of joblessness in the lives of individuals. Granovetter has demonstrated with his concept of social embeddedness that early employment contacts can enhance the prospects of getting a job and subsequent occupational mobility. The alternative implication is that youths who are embedded in criminal contexts can become isolated from the likelihood of legitimate adult employment. This has important implications for an understanding of crime and unemployment, for while much of past macro‐level research confirms that unemployment leads to crime in the aggregate, the reverse is likely true at the individual level among adolescents and young adults, especially in community settings with serious crime and unemployment problems. The implications of criminal embeddedness are explored in a well‐known set of London panel data. Understanding the process of embeddedness is important because it helps to identify points of intervention, such as peer and justice system contacts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)465-491
Number of pages27
JournalCriminology
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'THE SOCIAL EMBEDDEDNESS OF CRIME AND UNEMPLOYMENT'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this