The sperm-specific form of lactate dehydrogenase is required for fertility and is an attractive target for male contraception (a review)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There has been a recent upsurge in the interest about contraceptive development, evidenced by the Contraceptive Special Issue of Biology of Reproduction [1], with research funding from the Male Contraceptive Initiative and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Support from the Contraceptive Research Branch of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development continues with a marked change in focus in the funding announcements. This has motivated me to reflect on research, mostly from my laboratory starting in the 1960s to the present, on the development of a male contraceptive based on the sperm-specific glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase C (LDHC4). This review considers the rationale behind this research, the development paths pursued, obstacles encountered, and the renewed interest in going forward toward development of a male contraceptive mediated by the inhibition of the sperm-specific form of LDHC. I will address how some papers published many years ago are relevant to the present goals of non-hormonal contraception and will mention about innovative technology now available that can advance this project. This review presumably will serve as an instructive guide for a research program with a focused program related to contraception. As an aside, many of the citations in this review are to most of the 26 publications in Biology of Reproduction co-authored by this investigator and collaborators from 1974 through 2020 not long after the first issue of BOR which was published in April 1969.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-526
Number of pages6
JournalBiology of reproduction
Volume104
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 11 2021

Keywords

  • contraception
  • lactate dehydrogenase isozymes
  • sperm
  • testis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Cell Biology

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