The success and failure of Quality Improvement Projectsin peer production communities

Morten Warncke-Wang, Vladislav R. Ayukaev, Brent Hecht, Loren Terveen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Peer production communities have been proven to be successful at creating valuable artefacts, with Wikipedia as a prime example. However, a number of studies have shown that work in these communities tends to be of uneven quality and certain content areas receive more attention than others. In this paper, we examine the efficacy of a range of targeted strategies to increase the quality of under-Attended content areas in peer production communities. Mining data from five quality improvement projects in the English Wikipedia, the largest peer production community in the world, we show that certain types of strategies (e.g. creating artefacts from scratch) have better quality outcomes than others (e.g. improving existing artefacts), even if both are done by a similar cohort of participants. We discuss the implications of our findings for Wikipedia as well as other peer production communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCSCW 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages743-756
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781450329224
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 28 2015
Event18th ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2015 - BC, Canada
Duration: Mar 14 2015Mar 18 2015

Other

Other18th ACM International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2015
CountryCanada
CityBC
Period3/14/153/18/15

Keywords

  • peer production
  • quality modelling
  • user-generated content
  • Wikipedia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

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