The survival impact of CKS1B gains or amplification is dependent on the background karyotype and TP53 deletion status in patients with myeloma

Suyang Hao, Xinyan Lu, Zimu Gong, Roland L. Bassett, Shimin Hu, Sergej N. Konoplev, Guilin Tang, Shaoying Li, Jie Xu, Mahsa Khanlari, Hans C. Lee, Elisabet E. Manasanch, Donna M. Weber, Robert Z. Orlowski, L. Jeffrey Medeiros, Pei Lin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gains or amplification (amp) of chromosome 1q21/CKS1B are reported to be a high-risk factor in myeloma. In this retrospective study, we analyzed the impact of CKS1B gain/amp on overall survival in the context of other genetic aberrations, such as TP53 deletion, FGFR3-IGH, IGH-MAF, MYEOV/CCND1-IGH, and RB1, as well as karyotype. The cohort included 132 myeloma patients with CKS1B gain/amp detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. There were 72 men and 60 women with a median age of 65 years (range 39–88 years). A normal, simple, or complex karyotype was observed in 39.5%, 5.4%, and 55% of patients, respectively. “Double hit,” defined as CKS1B gain/amp coexisting with TP53 deletion, or “triple hit,” defined as double hit plus t(4;14)FGFR3-IGH or t(14;16)IGH-MAF, were identified in 25 patients (18.9%) and five patients (3.8%), respectively. Double and triple hit were highly associated with a complex karyotype (p = 0.02). Ninety-nine patients (99/128, 77.3%) received stem cell transplantation. The median follow-up time was 48.2 months (range 2–104 months); 68 patients (51.5%) died, with a median overall survival of 58.8 months. Multivariate analysis (Cox model) showed that double hit with TP53 deletion (p = 0.0031), triple hit (p = 0.01), and complex karyotype (p = 0.0009) were each independently associated with poorer overall survival. Stem cell transplantation was associated with better overall survival, mainly in patients with a double or triple hit and complex karyotype (p = 0.003). These findings indicate that the inferior outcome of myeloma patients with CKS1B gain/amp is attributable to the high number of high-risk patients in this group. The prognostic impact of CKS1B gain/amp depends on the background karyotype and TP53 status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalModern Pathology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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