The time-of-day that breaks occur between consecutive duty periods affects the sleep strategies used by shiftworkers

Gregory D. Roach*, Drew Dawson, Kathryn J. Reid, David Darwent, Charli Sargent

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the sleep strategies used in breaks between consecutive shifts. For two weeks, 253 shiftworkers collected data regarding the timing of all shifts and sleeps. The final dataset included 395 between-shift breaks that had a standard duration (i.e. ~16 h). If a break included an entire night, participants had a single sleep on 80–93% of occasions, but if a break occurred predominantly during the daytime, participants had more than one sleep on 41–50% of occasions. These data indicate that the sleep strategy employed is influenced by the time-of-day that a break occurs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)653-656
Number of pages4
JournalChronobiology International
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2016

Keywords

  • Activity monitor
  • Locomotive engineer
  • Monophasic
  • Polyphasic
  • Shiftwork
  • Sleep diary
  • Train driver
  • Transport
  • Volitional control
  • Work diary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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