The unique impact of changes in normal appearing brain tissue on cognitive dysfunction in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients

Darcy Cox, Daniel Pelletier, Claude Genain, Sharmila Majumdar, Ying Lu, Sarah Nelson, David C. Mohr*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between cognitive functioning, whole brain magnetic transfer ratio (MTR) imaging, supratentorial 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (1HMRSI), and conventional T1 and T2 imaging in a homogenous sample of SPMS patients. Methods: Nineteen patients underwent a single 90-min imaging session that obtained T1-and T2-weighted images and MTR. 1HMRSI was obtained on 14 of these patients. Patients underwent a neuropsychological battery, which was used to create an integrated measure of cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment was the dependent variable in two hierarchical multiple regression analyses in which T2 lesion load, T1 lesion load, and MTR or NAA/Cr were entered sequentially. Results. MTR was significantly related to cognitive functioning (ΔR2 =0.22, P =0.02) after accounting for T2 lesion load (ΔR2 =0.33, P =0.01) and T1 lesion load (ΔR2 =0.00, P = 0.98). NAA/Cr was not significantly related to cognitive functioning. Conclusions. Cognitive dysfunction may act as a clinical marker of normal appearing brain tissue pathology in multiple sclerosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)626-629
Number of pages4
JournalMultiple Sclerosis
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

Keywords

  • Cognitive impairment
  • MRI
  • Magnetic transfer ratio imaging
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Neuropsychological assessment
  • Spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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